‘I’d say it’s a very low bar’: Aquatic products maker calls for tougher enforcement of mercury standards

The aquatic products maker Aquamarine announced Monday it would be stepping up its enforcement of the federal mercury standards, following an outcry over the company’s products.

The move comes after the Food and Drug Administration in July adopted the agency’s standards, which require seafood producers to take precautions to avoid the potentially harmful mercury found in fish.

In a statement to Politico, Aquamina said it would “actively enforce the standards, including providing the public with information on mercury exposure.”

It also noted that Aquamara “is a member of the EWG, the National Association of Food and Agriculture Extension Agencies (NAFAE), and the Food & Water Watch.”

EPA standards have been challenged by both Aquaminer and Aquamaster, two seafood companies that operate independently in the U.S. and in Europe.

The companies argue the standards are unnecessary and outdated, citing research showing mercury in seafood can cause health problems.

In the past, Aquaminates products have come under fire for their lack of mercury content.

Last month, a group of health experts, including the National Academy of Sciences, criticized Aquamator’s products for failing to label mercury, including its own line of frozen seafood.

The FDA, meanwhile, has cited Aquamators products for potential health risks.

In June, the agency announced it was moving forward with a proposed rule requiring that all aquaculture fish be labeled, including salmon and tuna, as well as shrimp and mackerel.

The rule will go into effect in 2019, though some aquacultures are already using the label.