How do we manage the water and the oceans?

Posted October 12, 2018 07:02:03 The number of people and fish is on the rise in the world’s oceans.

But what happens when we forget about them? 

Researchers at the University of Exeter have created a simple and easy-to-follow model to help guide the management of marine ecosystems.

Professor James A. Seachem, who led the study, said: “We have now created a model that can be used to help manage the number of fish in our oceans.”

Dr Seacham, who is the co-author of a new paper on the subject, said the model would help people better understand how much water is being lost and how to reduce the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems and fisheries.

“Our models show how the number and size of fish populations fluctuate with the amount of land cover and climate,” he said.

“This model helps us to better manage and manage ecosystems that are changing rapidly.”

The model, which is available online, uses the data to calculate how much of the ocean is used for food and how much is used to fish.

“It shows that there is a real imbalance in the way the water is used and that it is a problem,” Dr Seachell said.

The models also predict how the amount and quality of fish and plankton might change over time, and what type of fish species might be found in different areas.

Dr A.S. Seaforth, the lead author of the study and a senior lecturer in marine ecology at the university, said they wanted to show that people were interested in marine ecosystems because of the economic benefits that they provide to people.

“They have been around for thousands of years and they are vital for the global economy,” he told the BBC.

“The economy depends on fish for their production.

They are very important to many different ecosystems and there is an urgent need for people to learn more about the marine environment.”

The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, showed that the model could help people to better understand the effects of climate changes on marine habitats.

“It is a great achievement and a major step forward,” said Professor Seachems co-researcher, Professor James A Seachere.

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