How algae and water pollution affect fish in the UK

A new report from the Institute for Marine Science (IMSS) has revealed how marine pollution affects fish in some parts of the UK, from the Gulf of St Lawrence to the North Sea.

The report, titled Aquatic productivity in the North Atlantic, was commissioned by the UK government to assess how pollution in the world’s oceans affects fish stocks.

It looked at fish stocks around the world, from Alaska to the Atlantic, and found that there are many areas in the oceans where pollution can have a negative impact on the growth of certain species.

This includes fish species that are at risk of being overfished and those that have been severely depleted of their water resources due to pollution.

The study was carried out in collaboration with scientists at the UK Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Department for Environment, Transport and Food, and the Institute of Marine Science.

Aquatic productivity, or the productivity of fish that live in freshwater habitats, is defined as their water consumption per unit of biomass.

This value is based on the average of the annual value of biomass of each fish species, as well as the average biomass of their natural habitats.

The value is calculated by dividing the amount of biomass per unit area in the natural environment by the annual biomass of the species.

In the case of algae and seaweed, the value is the difference between their biomass per area in freshwater and biomass per biomass in seaweed.

Researchers from the IMSS said they found that the total value of aquatic productivity is about 2.6 trillion pounds ($2.8 trillion) in the United Kingdom.

However, the report says that the UK’s fisheries are being devastated by pollution, and that this is creating a crisis for the species as a whole.

According to the IMS report, overfishing is the main cause of the overfishment of fish in British waters.

The report says overfisheries have led to an estimated loss of more than 10% of the total marine fish stock.

Overfishing of fish is a major threat to the survival of marine life and is a significant contributor to the loss of the world fish stock of around 1.6 million tonnes annually.

The loss of these fish is causing the UK economy to lose about $7.4 billion ($7.6 billion) in economic activity every year, the IMTS said.