What’s behind the rising tides in Jerusalem?

A surge in sea levels in the Holy Land has forced some people to seek shelter indoors, with many relying on seawater-based products to hydrate themselves.

The surge in seawater has caused flooding in some areas, forcing some residents to build temporary shelters and using other products to soak up the salty water.

“The water level in the aquifers is rising,” said Rabbi Moshe Z. Reuel, who heads the Rabbinical Council of America’s Sea-Life Research Institute.

Reuel said many people, who are trying to conserve water, have also begun to experiment with seawater.

Aqua-based shampoo, which is popular in Europe and the United States, was recently released in Israel, but Reuel said its success in Israel has been limited to a few weeks.

“We’ve had some successes in Europe, but there are not enough people who can use this product,” he said.

Reuel also warned against using seawater for personal hygiene, saying some people, such as those with allergies, may develop a reaction if exposed to seawater, which can cause irritation and swelling.

Zionist authorities have promised to regulate the seawater supply, but a recent poll found that about a quarter of the population, or 1.4 million, don’t understand the issue.

A recent survey of 2,000 residents found that 70 percent of them do not understand seawater or the need for it to be treated.

More than a million Israelis live in areas where seawater levels are higher than what is recommended for people to consume, the poll found.

Reuven Regev, the head of the Water Resources Authority, said the agency will soon launch an investigation into how much of the seaward water the country has used, how it was stored and whether there is a need to regulate it.

Regev said he has not received the results of the poll, but the water is being stored in a public aquifer, which means it can be released into the sea if necessary.

He said it would take at least two years for the water to be released to the sea.

But a recent survey found that many Israelis still use bottled water, despite the warnings.