Betta Aquatic Products suppliers face ‘disruptive effects’ of pollution

Betta, one of the world’s biggest suppliers of aquarium products, has been hit by a pollution scandal.

Maidenhead Aquatics, which has a long history of supplying marine aquaculture products to the public, has accused its suppliers of “disrupting” its business.

The firm’s chief executive, Andrew Johnson, has told the Australian Financial Review that the problems are the result of “corrosive, toxic, acidic environments” and have resulted in “negative impacts” on Betta’s reputation and ability to attract customers.

Betta’s products, including Betta Shark Tank, Shark Tank Fresh, and Shark Tank Blue, have been branded “dirty” by environmental groups and have been pulled from the shelves of some retailers.

Mr Johnson has said the problems have affected his company’s business and are now a “significant” threat to its reputation.

“We are concerned about what our suppliers are doing,” Mr Johnson told the Financial Review.

He said he was “absolutely devastated” by the “disturbing” allegations and the company was “committed to a full and frank response” to them.

Last year, the Federal Government banned the sale of Betta products to consumers.

At the time, Betta chief executive Ian Wysopal said the company had been “overwhelmed” by demand and would “continue to work tirelessly to protect the integrity of our products”.

The company has also been accused of misleading the public about the environmental and health risks of its products.

In March this year, a study conducted by the Environmental Protection Authority found that “a significant proportion” of Betera’s products were contaminated with “harmful” chemicals. AAP/ABC